Modeled Importance of Task Strategies and Achievement Beliefs: Effect on Self-Efficacy and Skill Development

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Dale H. Schunk, Dean (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: This experiment explored how modeling the importance of task strategy use and positive achievement beliefs affected self-efficacy and skill acquisition. Students deficient in division skills participated in a training program that included instruction and practice opportunities. In the context of instruction, students observed a model demonstrate division solution strategies. For one group the model emphasized the importance of using task strategies, for a second group the model emphasized the importance of positive achievement beliefs. Students in a third group received modeled importance of task strategy use and positive achievement beliefs. Modeling the importance of using task strategies enhanced students' motivation and skill development, but emphasizing both task strategy use and achievement beliefs led to the highest self-efficacy. Implications for teaching are discussed.

Additional Information

Publication
Journal of Early Adolescence, 5, 247-258.
Language: English
Date: 1985
Keywords
Learning, Strategies, Self-efficacy, Attribution, Self-image, Mathematics, Remedial instruction