Increasing cervical cancer screening among US Hispanics/Latinas: A qualitative systematic review

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Amanda Elizabeth Tanner, Assistant Professor (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: Hispanic/Latina women experience the highest cervical cancer incidence rates of any racial/ethnic group in the USA and tend to present with more severe cases and experience higher mortality compared to most other populations. The goals of this qualitative systematic review were to explore existing interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among US Hispanics/Latinas and to identify characteristics of effective interventions and research gaps. Six online databases were searched from their inception through June 30, 2013, using designated search terms and keywords. Peer-reviewed articles that documented an intervention designed to improve screening for cervical cancer among Hispanics/Latinas ages 18 years and older living in the USA were reviewed. Data were abstracted using a standardized form to document intervention characteristics and results. Forty-five articles, describing 32 unique interventions, met inclusion criteria. Identified interventions consisted primarily of educational programs and/or provision of screening. Interventions used lay health advisors (LHAs), clinic-based outreach/delivery strategies, partnerships with churches, and mass media campaigns. Twelve interventions resulted in significant increases in cervical cancer screening rates. Interventions developed utilizing theory, applying community-based participatory research approaches, and using LHAs were identified as having the greatest potential for improving cervical cancer screening among Hispanics/Latinas. There continues to be a need for the development of interventions in geographic areas with new and emerging Hispanic/Latino populations and that are comprehensive, follow participants for longer periods of time, and broaden the roles and build the capacities of LHAs.

Additional Information

Publication
Journal of Cancer Education, 30, 374-387
Language: English
Date: 2014
Keywords
Cervical cancer, Screening, Hispanic/Latino, Women, Intervention, Systematic review

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