Nutrition knowledge and behaviors of low-income Latino parents of preschoolers: Associations with nutrition-related parenting practices.

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Jennifer Toller Erausquin, Assistant Professor (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: Parents are in an ideal position to promote long-term healthy dietary behaviours for their children. This study aimed to determine parent and child characteristics and to test their associations in a cross-sectional sample of urban low-income, low-education Latino immigrants with preschool-age children. Also determined were family demographic characteristics, child feeding practices, parent nutrition knowledge, parent fruit and vegetable consumption, and child Body Mass Index (BMI). Our analysis shows several significant associations: (1) lower parent nutrition knowledge and less healthy child feeding practices (increased pressure, p?=?0.017 and increased restrictions, p?=?037); (2) higher parent vegetable consumption and healthier child feeding practices (more responsibility for the types and amount of food eaten, p?=?0.022, and less restrictions on child eating, p?=?0.030); and (3) a significant difference by child gender, such that parents of girls with higher BMIs for their age group being more concerned about their daughter's weight (p?=?0.004) and practising healthier feeding practices, that is, less pressure (p?=?0.008). Our findings support promoting healthy eating within the context of the family, and contribute to a growing literature on preschool parent–child feeding practices. Understanding the practices of immigrant Latino parents can help researchers and practitioners develop culturally appropriate interventions to address childhood obesity.

Additional Information

Publication
Language: English
Date: 2012
Keywords
nutrition, parent nutrition knowledge, child nutrition, preschool children, parenting practices, low-income families, latino families, child feeding behaviors

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