Cynthia Bacon

EDUCATION 2012, PhD in Nursing, Concentration in Health Care Quality and Patient Outcomes, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing 1996, Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) in Nursing Administration, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing 1992, Master of Administrative Science (MAS) in Business Management, Johns Hopkins University. Carey School of Business 1988, Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Notre Dame of Maryland University 1987, Diploma in Nursing, Union Memorial Hospital School of Nursing WORK EXPERIENCE 1987-2012, Held various clinical and administrative roles in the acute care hospital setting. 2013-2015, Assistant Professor at NCA&T School of Nursing 2015-Present, Assistant Professor at UNCG School of Nursing RESEARCH INTERESTS My research centers on health care systems and the structural supports that enable professional nursing practice, Specifically: - Maximizing professional nursing practice (participation in decision making, autonomy and collaboration) in nurses' work environments to achieve quality in nurse and patient outcomes. - Work complexity - Nurses' participation in decision making - Organizational theory and organizational behavior influences on nurses' work i.e. group dynamics, working in teams - Mentoring and development of nurse leaders - Attaining quality and safety outcomes for patients

There are 2 included publications by Cynthia Bacon :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Does safety climate moderate the influence of staffing adequacy and work conditions on nurse injuries? 2007 594 Problem:Hospital nurses have one of the highest work-related injury rates in the United States. Yet, approaches to improving employee safety have generally focused on attempts to modify individual behavior through enforced compliance with safety rule...
Organizational influences on patient perceptions of symptom management 2009 603 We tested a theoretical model of the relationships of hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics to patients’ perceptions of the extent to which nurses met their expectations for management of troubling symptoms. In our sam...