Steven J. Peach

Steven J. Peach is a doctoral candidate in American history specializing in American Indian history, early America, and the Atlantic world. His dissertation examines Creek Indian community politics in the American South from the colonial period to 1821. He received his BA and MA degrees in American history from Northern Illinois University. He has earned a research grant from the American Philosophical Society, published an article in Ethnohistory, and in 2014, the UNCG College of Arts and Sciences awarded him with a Bernard Dissertation Fellowship. Additionally, Steven has presented at the American Society for Ethnohistory, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, and the UNC American Indian Center. He may be contacted at sjpeach@uncg.edu or twitter@SPeach86.

There are 2 included publications by Steven J. Peach :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
“The three rivers have talked”: the Creek Indians and community politics in the Native South, 1753-1821 2016 11 This dissertation is a political history of the Creek Indians spanning the years between the conclusion of the Creek-Cherokee War in 1753 and the Creek Redstick migration to Florida. That migration came to a conclusion in 1821, when the United States...
Tomochichi’s Trans-Atlantic Quest for Traditional Power in the Colonial Southeast. 2013 2393 This essay reinterprets the life of a famous Muscogee Creek leader and examines the relationship between chiefly power and foreign travel in American Indian studies and Atlantic world studies. In spring 1734, the Creek headman Tomochichi and British ...