Robert Anemone

As a paleoanthropologist, I am broadly interested in Human and Primate Evolution, seeking to understand what the fossil record tells us about the patterns and processes involved in the evolution of humans and our primate relatives, the apes, monkeys, and prosimians. Early in my career I worked on the functional morphology of prosimian primates in relation to their patterns of locomotion, and on life history of apes and humans as revealed through an analysis of dental development. More recently I have focused my research on primate and human paleontology. My fieldwork has ranged widely across both geographic space (from the American West to Eastern and Southern Africa), and time (from the Late Cretaceous to the Pleistocene), and with respect to taxonomy (including studies of non-primate mammals, prosimian primates, apes and hominins). Recently I have been developing and field-testing predictive models for locating fossils based on the analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery and utilizing analytical approaches from Geographic Information Systems (GIS). I am also committed to using the tools provided by Anthropology to interrogate the multiple and complex meanings of Race and Human Diversity in American society through my scholarship, teaching and outreach.

There are 12 included publications by Robert Anemone :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
An anachronistic Clarkforkian mammal fauna from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation (Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, USA). 2009 894 The Clarkforkian (latest Paleocene) North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA) remains a relatively poorly sampled biostratigraphic interval at the close of the Paleocene epoch that is best known from the Bighorn Basin of northwestern Wyoming. A period...
Are there two distinct types of hypocone in Eocene primates? The “pseudohypocone” of notharctines revisited 2012 499 Upper molars of modern humans and most extant primates have four cusps that have evolved from the original tribosphenic tooth of therian mammals. These include the three cusps of the original trigon (e.g., paracone, metacone, and protocone), and t...
A Companion to Biological Anthropology [book review] 2011 955 The publication of a new volume in the Blackwell Companions to Anthropology series provides an opportunity to reflect on the nature and breadth of our discipline. According to the publisher, the aim of this series is to offer “comprehensive syntheses...
Finding Fossils in New Ways: An Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predicting the Location of Productive Fossil Localities 2011 569 Chance and serendipity have long played a role in the location of productive fossil localities by vertebrate paleontologists and paleoanthropologists. We offer an alternative approach, informed by methods borrowed from the geographic information scie...
Fossil GPS 2014 689 The article focuses on paleontology and discusses how luck has played a big role in many of the world's great fossil discoveries. It also discusses a new technique that improves the odds of finding ancient bones. It reports on the use of modern compu...
GIS and Paleoanthropology: Incorporating New Approaches from the Geospatial Sciences in the Analysis of Primate and Human Evolution. 2011 1863 The incorporation of research tools and analytical approaches from the geospatial sciences is a welcome trend for the study of primate and human evolution. The use of remote sensing (RS) imagery and geographic information systems (GIS) allows vertebr...
Google Earth, GIS, and the Great Divide: a new and simple method for sharing paleontological data. 2008 2058 Introduction The ease, efficiency, and speed of data communication and analyses are paramount to, and characteristic of, any mature science. GIS is an extraordinarily powerful tool for many aspects of (geo)spatial analyses (Longley et al., 2001), bu...
Let your fingers do the walking: a simple spectral signature model for “remote” fossil prospecting. 2012 815 Even with the most meticulous planning, and utilizing the most experienced fossil-hunters, fossil prospecting in remote and/or extensive areas can be time-consuming, expensive, logistically challenging, and often hit or miss. While nothing can predic...
Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology. A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay [book review] 2010 1123 It is a great pleasure to review a volume honoring Fred Szalay’s many outstanding contributions to vertebrate paleontology and evolutionary morphology. The latest entry in Springer’s Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology series is a fitting t...
An Object-Oriented Approach to Extracting Productive Fossil Localities from Remotely Sensed Imagery 2015 630 2015-2016 UNCG University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund Grant Winner. Most vertebrate fossils are rare and difficult to find and although paleontologists andpaleoanthropologists use geological maps to identify potential fossil-bearing deposit...
Patterns of Growth and Development in the Genus Homo [book review] 2004 544 The study of the growth, development, and life history of primates has seen a resurgence of interest among biological anthropologists over the past two decades. In particular, paleoanthropologists have broadened their analyses of fossil hominins to i...
Reconstructing Behavior in the Primate Fossil Record [book review] 2003 793 How can we best understand the adaptive significance of morphological features of fossil primates and, based on this understanding, reconstruct the behavior of these organisms? This edited volume, based on a Leakey Foundation-sponsored conference hel...