Eugene F. Rogers

Educated at Princeton, Tübingen, Rome, and Yale, Rogers taught from 1993 to 2005 at the University of Virginia, where for several years he chaired the Program in Theology, Ethics, and Culture. All nine of his finished Ph.D. students have had full-time employment in colleges or universities. In 2005 he joined his husband Derek Krueger at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he is professor of Religious Studies and faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies. In 2002-03, Rogers was the Eli Lilly Visiting Associate Professor of Christian Thought and Practice in the Religion Department at Princeton University. He has held fellowships from the Fulbright Commission, the Mellon Foundation, the National Humanities Center, the Lilly Foundation, the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton Seminary, the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, Tantur Ecumenical Research Institute in Jerusalem, and the Templeton Foundation. He is author or editor of six books and over 40 articles and translations (in print or in press, not counting reviews). His book Sexuality and the Christian Body was named “essential reading” among books published in the past 25 years by Christian Century in 2010. His most recent book is Aquinas and the Supreme Court: Race, Gender, and the Failure of Natural Law in Thomas’s Biblical Commentaries (Blackwell 2013). His seventh book, now in progress, is called The Persistence of Blood: How Blood-Talk Seeps in Where It Hardly Seems to Belong.

There are 10 included publications by Eugene F. Rogers :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
How the Virtues of an Interpreter Presuppose and Perfect Hermeneutics: The Case of Thomas Aquinas 1996 512 This essay enlists Thomas Aquinas to enrich a late twentieth-century retrieval of the literal reading of biblical narrative in the Christian tradition. It argues that the Summa theologiae can be read so that the sensus litteralis, far from promoting ...
Isaac in the Eucharist 2002 398 The story of Abraham's celebration and risk of Isaac is central to traditional Christian thought and worship, and with it the question of religious violence. Traditional Christian interpreters see the Trinity in a festive meal at which Abraham celebr...
The Kindness of God: Metaphor, Gender, and Religious Language – By Janet Martin Soskice 2009 1667 This article is a review of the book The Kindness of God: Metaphor, Gender, and Religious Language by Janet Martin Soskice.
The Liturgical Body 2000 865 I had feared that this might be a book to alienate all possible readers: too conservative in theology to suit social liberals, and too liberal in conclusions to suit social conservatives. I am therefore grateful for constructive engagement from both ...
Nature with water and the Spirit: a response to Rowan Williams 2003 392 For Paul, ‘nature’ works differently for free Jewish men (torah-observers) and others (slaves, Gentiles, women), so that in Paul ‘nature’ is a differentiated rather than universal philosophical concept. Paul so differentiates natures according to the...
Prayer, Christoformity, and the Author: New Sites of Discussion for Theology 2014 82 You should read this book —and assign at least part of it in class (the most quotable quotes cluster, usefully, in the gorgeous Prelude)—because there is really nothing else like it. It really is an essay “On the Trinity.” And it really does contribu...
Same-Sex Marriage as an Ascetic Practice in the Light of Romans 1 and Ephesians 5 2014 271 This article presents same-sex marriage as an ascetic practice and answers objections to same-sex marriage from Romans 1 and Ephesians 5.
Supplementing Barth on Jews and Gender: Identifying God by Anagogy and the Spirit 1998 513 Karl Barth leaves room by his own principles for further, even different thinking about Jews and gender (and, as a corollary, about homosexuality) than he records in the Dogmatics. Now that Marquardt, Klappert, Sonderegger, Soulen, and others have of...
Systematic Theology Vol. I [book review] 1999 352 This article is a review of the book Systematic Theology Vol. 1, The Triune God by Robert W. Jenson.
Thomas and Barth in Convergence on Romans 1 1996 556 This article summarizes research on the natural knowledge of God and the construal of sacred doctrine in question one of the Summa Theologiae and chapter 1 of Thomas's Romans commentary, with a comparison to Karl Barth. It takes as its challenge and ...