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Lili Sahakyan

Education: 1997 — 2002 Ph.D., Cognitive Psychology, Florida State University ; 1995 — 1997 M.A., Counseling Psychology, Slippery Rock University of PA ; 1994 — 1995 B.A., Psychology, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania ; 1991 — 1994 State University of Armenia, Psychology Department. Professional Experience: 2005 — present Assistant Professor, Psychology Department, UNCG ; 2004 — 2005 Assistant Professor, Psychology Department, USF ; 2002 — 2004 Visiting Assistant Professor, Psychology Department, UF. I am interested in human long-term memory, with a particular emphasis on forgetting phenomena. I examine the mechanisms behind the unintentional and intentional forms of forgetting, including how changes in episodic context influence memory retrieval.

There are 8 included publications by Lili Sahakyan :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Can encoding differences explain the benefits of directed forgetting in the list-method paradigm? 2003 1036 We propose that the benefits of directed forgetting are explained by the differences in recall arising from individual strategy choices used to encode List 2. In Experiment 1, inducing participants to encode both lists using the same strategy (either...
Directed forgetting in incidental learning and recognition testing: Support for a two-factor account 2005 966 Instructing people to forget a list of items often leads to better recall of subsequently studied lists (known as the benefits of directed forgetting). The authors have proposed that changes in study strategy are a central cause of the benefits (L. ...
Intentional Forgetting Is Easier After Two “Shots” Than One* 2008 791 Are some things easier to deliberately forget than others? We will propose that the answer to this question is yes and that the kinds of things easier to forget may provide important clues as to how intentional forgetting occurs. Such efforts are tim...
Item-Specific Encoding Produces an Additional Benefit of Directed Forgetting : Evidence From Intrusion Errors 2010 177 List-method directed forgetting involves encoding 2 lists, between which half of the participants are told to forget List 1. When participants are free to study however they want, directed forgetting impairs List 1 recall and enhances List 2 recall i...
Oh, Honey, I Already Forgot That : Strategic Control of Directed Forgetting in Older and Younger Adults* 2008 403 This article is about age-related differences in intentional forgetting of unwanted information. Imagine receiving medication and reading the directions on how to take it. Afterwards, the doctor tells you to take a different dosage at a different tim...
Remembering to Forget: The Amnesic Effect of Daydreaming 2010 932 Daydreaming mentally transports people to another place or time. Many daydreams are similar in content to the thoughts that people generate when they intentionally try to forget. Thus, thoughts like those generated during daydreaming can cause forget...
Self-evaluation as a moderating factor of strategy change in directed forgetting benefits 2004 403 In list method directed forgetting, instructing people to forget a studied word list usually results in better recall for a newly studied list. Sahakyan and Delaney (2003) have suggested that these benefits are due to a change in encoding strategy th...
Unexpected costs of high working memory capacity following directed forgetting and context change manipulations 2007 690 Greater working memory capacity is usually associated with greater ability to maintain information in the face of interruptions. In two experiments, we found that some types of interruptions actually lead to greater forgetting among high-span people ...