Linda F. Stine

Landscape archaeology; social inequality; migration and Diaspora; plantation and farmstead; applied archaeology; teaching praxis. Focus on hands-on student research in the archaeology laboratory, at fieldschool and in the classroom. I consider myself primarily an historical archaeologist, although my initial training was in prehistoric southeastern archaeology. My career parallels the growth of cultural resource management (CRM). I worked professionally for various archaeological consulting firms, ran a sole proprietorship and served as the environmental review archaeologist for the State of South Carolina applying my knowledge of prehistoric and historic southeastern archaeology. As an applied archaeologist and educator I believe that my primary duty is to provide students with hands-on experience in the field and the laboratory. Qualified students are given the opportunity for more intensive research with our collections. My graduate education, university teaching and various CRM jobs helped form my research on the archaeology of plantations and farmsteads. My initial exposure to early slave village archaeology 25 plus years ago ensured my interest in emerging and diverse southern and Caribbean cultures and cultural identities. I seek to illustrate how evidence for changing cultural practices, behaviors and beliefs can be seen in the archaeological record. Transforming southern culture is still a major research interest, especially applying a landscape perspective derived from historical ecology. I also partner with local historical societies and parks at their sites, such as Blandwood, Tannenbaum Historic Park and Troublesome Creek Ironworks, offering research and educational opportunities for students and volunteers. I serve the public as an advisor about preservation, site interpretation and CRM procedures pertaining to local prehistoric and historic sites.

There are 5 included publications by Linda F. Stine :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Blue Beads as African-American Cultural Symbols 1996 5887 Blue beads are consistent finds at African-American sites. Archaeologists acknowledge these artifacts were used for adornment, yet some researchers also propose beads pos sessed additional cultural meaning among African Ameri cans. For this study bea...
A Brief and True Account of the History of South Carolina Plantation Archaeology and the Archaeologists Who Practice It 2004 4067 This paper’s genesis is the perception that archaeologists’ communal memory of the early days of South Carolina plantation archaeology is fading, incomplete or at times overly judgmental. In order to combat this loss, some of the projects, processe...
Multidisciplinary Landscape Research at Tannenbaum Historic Park, Guilford County, North Carolina 2003 1616 Interdisciplinary research demonstrates that the extant Hoskins log cabin (31GF413**), at Tannenbaum Historic Park in Greensboro, North Carolina, is located on or near an eighteenth-century house site. The Park is part of the Guilford Courthouse B...
Public Archaeology in the National Park Service: A Brief Overview and Case Study 2014 1836 Archaeologists are integral in National Park Service (NPS) culture. Some archaeologists “wear the hat” and the authoritative uniform symbolizing the park service, yet non–park service archaeologists can work at the parks with research permits under t...
Social Inequality and Turn-of-the-Century Farmsteads: Issues of Class, Status, Ethnicity, and Race 1990 1428 The following epistemological exploration provides a framework for analyzing the social stratification of one Upland South community in North Carolina from about A.D. 1900 to 1940. Specific examples derive from a rural, crossroads community, while th...