Tara T. Green

Professor Tara T. Green has degrees in English from Louisiana State University (M.A., Ph.D.) and Dillard University (BA) and has taught at universities in Louisiana and Arizona. She is currently Professor and Director of African American Studies at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro. Her areas of research include, Black gender studies, African American autobiographies and fiction, African American experiences in the South, and the African diaspora in the U.S. She is the author of A Fatherless Child: Autobiographical Perspectives of African American Men (University of Missouri Press, 2009). Winner of the 2011 Outstanding Scholarship in Africana Studies Award from the National Council for Black Studies, A Fatherless Child focuses on the impact of fatherlessness from the perspectives of Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama. She is also the editor of From the Plantation to the Prison: African American Confinement Literature (Mercer University Press, 2008) and Presenting Oprah Winfrey, Her Films, and African American Literature (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Inspired by her upbringing in the New Orleans area, she is completing a book manuscript on New Orleans writer and activist Alice Dunbar-Nelson. She has presented papers at national and international conferences as well as specialized presentations to local schools and civic organizations. Beyond her research, Professor Green has received recognition for her work as an educator and mentor. She is President of the Langston Hughes Society and a community member of the News and Record's Editorial Board. Dr. Green enjoys mentoring students and working with community organizations.

There are 4 included publications by Tara T. Green :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Evaluating Evaluations: Answering the Unasked Question. 2005 623 Green comments on the inability of Americans to speak frankly about racial tensions and conflicts in America. After feeling dismayed by how little her students know about African-Americans, Green suggests that it is time to construct effective ways t...
Mother Dear: The Motivations of Tina McElroy Ansa’s Mudear. 2002 1637 Until the 1997 publication of the Oxford Companion of African-American Literature, Tina McElroy Ansa's work had not received the kind of attention it deserves. Instead, she was considered to be one of many contemporary Black, popular fiction novelist...
Sexed-Up and Dumbed-Down: Black Southern Men in James McBride's Miracle at St. Anna 2011 693 James McBride's Miracle at St. Anna provides a fictional account of black World War II soldiers who find themselves stranded in an Italian village. McBride relies on a violent and foreign setting to interrogate a black experience. Here, Green explore...
Voodoo Feminism Through the Lens of Jewell Parker Rhodes's Voodoo Dreams 2012 3075 The tradition of conjuring is well documented and discussed in African American literary discourse. Marjorie Pryse comments on Alice Walker's professed role in writing The Color Purple (1982), “If there is magic involved in Walker's perception of her...