Han Li

  • Post-Doctoral Research Associate
  • Biology, UNCG
  • h_li6@uncg.edu
  • (336) 256-1043
  • 403 Eberhart Building

I received my doctoral degree in biology from Baylor University in Waco, TX, where I conducted research on urban bat distribution, roost selection, and foraging habitat selection. I started working for University of North Carolina Greensboro as a post-doctoral research associate in 2015. I manage a statewide bat acoustic monitor program for North Carolina and contribute to the North American Bat Monitoring Program. My current research focuses on landscape scale effects of urbanization on bat distribution, population dynamics, and conservation.

There are 4 included publications by Han Li :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Determining species-specific nightly bat activity in sites with varying urban intensity 2018 77 Time of peak bat activity during the night differs among bat species due to temperature, prey availability, habitat availability, and/or interactions between species. Habitat availability is altered in urban areas, which may affect insect prey availa...
Patch or mosaic: bat activity responds to fine-scale urban heterogeneity in a medium-sized city in the United States 2014 218 Many recent studies have suggested that cities are spatially heterogeneous. Only limited research has investigated whether urban heterogeneity influences the distribution of bats in a city. Between 2010 and 2012, we acoustically surveyed bats in Waco...
Rapid increases in bat activity and diversity after wetland construction in an urban ecosystem 2018 112 Wetland construction can mitigate the biodiversity and water quality losses associated with reduced natural wetland coverage. While beneficial effects of wetland construction for bats have been observed in natural and rural settings, the effects of w...
Separating the effects of water quality and urbanization on temperate insectivorous bats at the landscape scale 2017 216 [2017-2018 UNCG University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund Grant Winner.] Many local scale studies have shown that bats respond to water quality degradation or urbanization in a species-specific manner. However, few have separated the effects o...