Travis Anderson

Travis Anderson is a Ph.D student in the Department of Kinesiology, advised and monitored by Dr. Laurie Wideman. He received his B.S. (Summa Cum Laude) in Exercise and Sports Science (Fitness and Nutrition) from Oregon State University in 2013, and his M.A. in Exercise Physiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2016. While at Oregon State University, Travis was a student-athlete on the Men's Soccer Team, earning Academic All-American honors his senior season, and was a recipient of the NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship and Ruth E. Warnke Scholarship. He is currently a recipient of the UNC Greensboro Excellence Graduate Award. His primary research interests include the characterization of the stress-adaptation-maladaptation progression (i.e. overtraining), and how biomarker models may be used to predict and ultimately prevent the overtraining syndrome. Travis would also like to extend our current knowledge, understanding, and application of overtraining research methodology to non-athletic populations. In addition, Travis is currently exploring the use of the cortisol awakening response as a potential marker for exercise-induced stress and adaptation.

There are 4 included publications by Travis Anderson :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Cortisol and testosterone dynamics following exhaustive endurance exercise 2016 16 Purpose: Cortisol (C) and testosterone (T) are impacted significantly by prolonged endurance exercise with inverse responses. Increases in C are witnessed concurrently with decrements in T, possibly impacting recovery. This study was conducted...
Exercise and the cortisol awakening response: a systematic review 2017 16 Background: The cortisol awakening response (CAR) has been used as a biomarker of stress response in a multitude of psychological investigations. While a myriad of biochemical responses have been proposed to monitor responses to exercise train...
The Independent Effects of Strength Training in Cancer Survivors: a Systematic Review 2016 18 Cancer treatment is associated with adverse changes in strength, body composition, physical function, and quality of life. Exercise training reduces cancer incidence and mortality rates and may offset some of the treatment-related effects. To determi...
Resting-Exercise Salivary Cortisol Responses: Detecting the Magnitude of Hormonal Change over Time 2016 16 This study investigated the validity of salivary cortisol responses to reflect blood cortisol responses relative to the magnitude of change observed over time in the hormone. Male subjects (n=25) conducted four experimental sessions (ES) where blood ...