Cuda, Anthony

uncg

There are 4 item/s.

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Hidden in plain sight: Virgilian, Dantean, and Laforguian allusions in T. S. Eliot's "La figlia che piange" 2010 5472 I argue in this paper that "La Figlia che Piange" is T. S. Eliot's first masterpiece to truly reflect his ambition to be a poet of stature and that it is the earliest poem forecasting his poetic signatures that remain throughout the rest of his oeuvr...
The gift of the bee-Poet: Bee Symbolism in H.D.'s Poetry and Prose 2012 2710 The bee has played a significant role in human cultures and religions since before the time of the ancient Egyptians and, as a result, has become a well-known symbol in world mythologies and literature. In this thesis, I explore the ways in which H.D...
“I who am here dissembled”: exteriority in T.S. Eliot and his modernist contemporaries 2016 160 This dissertation examines the way that twentieth-century Modernist poet T. S. Eliot stages the production and reproduction of human subjectivity in his work. It places him in context of other thinkers of the period (poets, novelists, social theorist...
Turning back the tides: the Anglo-Saxon vice of ofermod in Tolkien’s Fall of Arthur AND The neighbors in the village: Frost’s debt to Dante, Longfellow, and James in “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" 2016 51 Tolkien’s Fall of Arthur has at its heart the theme of ofermod, a theme which appears throughout Tolkien’s criticism and creative work. In his essay “The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm’s Son,” he argues that the Anglo-Saxon word ofermod in the p...