Retirement modeling [electronic resource] : an exploration of the effects of retirement role model characteristics on retirement self-efficacy and life satisfaction in midlife workers

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Melanie Claire Harper (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Jane E. Myers

Abstract: " The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among retirement role model characteristics, retirement self-efficacy, and current life satisfaction in midlife workers. Most of the literature related to retirement planning and to counseling workers who are preparing for retirement (e.g., Harper & Shoffner, 2004; Perkins, 2000; Quick, 1990) does not contain suggestions for assisting workers in identifying and observing retirement role models, possibly because there is little evidence as to if and how role models affect retirement self-efficacy. Considering that self-efficacy predicts later performance (Bandura, 1977a, 1997), interventions that increase retirement self-efficacy can be expected to increase later success in the tasks associated with transitioning to retirement, in addition to reducing preretirement anxiety. In this study, a proposed structural model describing the relationships among role model characteristics, retirement self-efficacy, and current life satisfaction was tested, and correlations among the model variables were examined. A model describing the relationships among two role model characteristics (success of models in retirement and similarity of abilities and resources between role models and the participants), retirement self-efficacy, and current life satisfaction was determined to be a good fit. Significant positive correlations at the p < .01 level were identified between current life satisfaction and both retirement self-efficacy (r = .52) and variety of retirement role models (r = .28) and between retirement self-efficacy and both success of models in retirement (r = .36) and variety of models (r = 18). The role model characteristic of success of models in retirement also correlated significantly (p < .01) with the other two retirement role model characteristics, variety of models (r = .20) and similarity of abilities and resources between the role models and the participants. Participants for the study were 218 University of North Carolina at Greensboro employees between the ages of 45 and 60 years. Participants completed the Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI; Australian Centre on Quality of Life, 2002), a modified version of the Retirement Self-Efficacy (RSE) Scale (Neuhs, 1991), the Retirement Observations Questionnaire (ROQ; Harper, 2004), and a demographic questionnaire." Abstract from author supplied metadata.

Additional Information

Publication
Dissertation
Language: English
Date: 2005
Keywords
retirement, role model characteristics, midlife workers, retirement planning, counseling, personal wellbeing index, retirement self-efficacy scale
Subjects
Retirement--Planning
Age and employment--North Carolina
Middle age--Psychological aspects
Self-efficacy
Role models