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Vulnerability to childhood depression : race and age differences

UNCW Author/Contributor (non-UNCW co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Kristen Longmire (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW )
Web Site: http://library.uncw.edu/
Advisor
Caroline Clements

Abstract: This study examined race and age differences in children’svulnerability to depression, negative life events, and negative attributional styles to explain these events.. The relationship between parent-child depression and explanatory styles was also assessed. There were no significant age or race differences in depression. There were no significant racial differences in attributional or inferential styles. Younger children reported more internal and global attributional styles than older children. Younger children reported the consequences of negative life events as more disastrous than older children. In younger Caucasians, negative life events were the only predictors of depression in the equations assessing the role of attributional styles and stress in predicting depression. In older Caucasians, STAGLO predicted depression. In the equations assessing the role of inferential styles and stress in predicting depression, there was a significant consequence-stress interaction in older Caucasians. In older African- Americans, only stress predicted depression. In younger African-Americans, no cognitive style predicted depression. When groups were collapsed across race, negative life events and STAGLO were the only predictors of depression in the equations assessing attributional style and stress. The interaction terms were not significant. For equations assessing the role of event consequences and stress, there was a significant consequence-stress interaction in both age groups. Higher depression scores in parents were associated with higher child depression, more internal child attributions, and a greater tendency for the child to view the self as flawed.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
A Thesis Submitted to the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts
Language: English
Date: 2009
Keywords
Beck Depression Inventory, Depression in children
Subjects
Depression in children
Beck Depression Inventory