Destruction of the Caribbean Landscape Through Colonization in Edgar Mittelholzer's Corentyne Thunder, Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, and Wilson Harris' Palace Of The Peacock

ECU Author/Contributor (non-ECU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Sandra Williams (Creator)
Institution
East Carolina University (ECU )
Web Site: http://www.ecu.edu/lib/

Abstract: The Caribbean Islands have long been known for their lush, tropical scenery. For this distinctive landscape to continue to be so alluring throughout the centuries, to the natives as well as to others, it must be respected, revered, and cared for in a loving manner, ensuring that generation after generation can continue to enjoy the islands' natural wonders. Much literature abounds speaking of the issues concerning the stunning landscape of these islands, which have produced an abundance of writers who have supplied readers with portraits of Caribbean society and political issues which exist therein. Three native writers have distinctively covered the Caribbean canvas with a unique representation of landscape as it relates to physical elements, environment of the savannahs and the mental components relating to the indigenous people, their heritage, and how colonialism affected them.   Ever since Columbus' voyage went awry, causing him to land on San Salvador, writers have revealed the devastation inflicted upon weaker souls who withstood the cruelties imposed upon them for the sake of monetary gain. One such author is Edgar Mittelholzer, who penned Corentyne Thunder, and reveals how Columbus and those who came after him carelessly used the savannah and her people for their own purposes, illustrating how not only the land was changed, but the people and their heritage as well. Another novelist who parallels Mittelholzer's art is Jean Rhys, creating Wide Sargasso Sea so readers can see through the eyes of an island victim how relentless intruders were to accomplish selfish goals. Lastly, Wilson Harris, whose love of country complements Mittelholzer and Rhys, displays his unique style in Palace of the Peacock, allowing readers to enter the minds of those who conquered the lands for selfish gain, to show that sometimes the conqueror realizes the devastation inflicted upon his victims and their homeland. These three writers used the lives of natives from the Caribbean Islands to illustrate how the devastating effects of colonialism changed people and their lands forever and these literary artists did this in quite a unique manner which greatly adds to scholarship.  

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2010

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TitleLocation & LinkType of Relationship
Destruction of the Caribbean Landscape Through Colonization in Edgar Mittelholzer's Corentyne Thunder, Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, and Wilson Harris' Palace Of The Peacockhttp://thescholarship.ecu.edu/bitstream/handle/10342/2834/Williams_ecu_0600M_10136.pdfThe described resource references, cites, or otherwise points to the related resource.