Steven J. Hageman Ph.D.

There are 6 included publications by Steven J. Hageman Ph.D.:

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Bryozoan colonial growth forms as paleoenvironmental indicators: evaluation of methodology and predictive utility 1997 2241 Bryozoans have played a significant ecological role in many shallow marine benthic communities since the Ordovician and are important contributors to carbonate sediment production in many modern cool-water marine environments. Correlation between bry...
Complexity Generated by Iteration of Hierarchical Modules in Bryozoa 2003 1692 Growth in colonial organisms by iteration of modules inherently provides for an increase in available morpho-ecospace relative to their solitary relatives. Therefore, the interpretation of the functional or evolutionary significance of complexity wit...
Cool-Water Carbonate Production from Epizoic Bryozoans on Ephemeral Substrates 2000 2179 Bryozoan skeletons are a dominant constituent of cool-water carbonate sediments in the Cenozoic of southern Australia. The primary substrate on much of the modern continental shelf is loose sediment that is reworked intermittently to 200+ m water dep...
Magnetic Susceptibility As A Proxy For Coal Ash Pollution Within Riverbed Sediments In A Watershed With Complex Geology (Southeastern USA) 2017 14 A study of near surface sediments from the Dan River (southeastern USA) was conducted to assess the use of magnetic properties as proxies of coal ash after a recent spill. The watershed geology is diverse and potentially contributes magnetic minerals...
Paleoenvironmental Significance of Celleporaria (Bryozoa) from Modern and Tertiary Cool-water Carbonates of Southern Australia 2003 3172 Certain members of the bryozoan genus Celleporaria form large, erect colonies of hollow branches ( 10–30 cm tall and 1–3 cm diameter). These are common and conspicuous in Pleistocene and Cenozoic neritic strata of the southern margin of Australia. Mo...
Threshold Effects of Food Concentration on the Skeletal Morphology of the Bryozoan Electra Pilosa (Linnaeus, 1767) 2009 1751 Many palaeontological studies rely heavily on characteristics of the preserved phenotype, i.e. the morphology of skeletal hard parts. Although the potential for environmental influences on the phenotype is expected, rarely is the magnitude of the eff...