"Myself yet not quite myself" : Jane Eyre, Wide Sargasso Sea, and a third space of enunciation ; and, "Being herself invisible, unseen, unknown" : Mrs. Dalloway, the Hours, and the re-inscribed lesbian woman

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Serena Reavis (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Christian Moraru

Abstract: "In Wide Sargasso Sea, Rhys gives voice to the creole woman and provides a space for the other's enunciation by "creolizing" Jane Eyre. Rhys creates a place that is at once both Jane Eyre and not Jane Eyre, an ambivalence that captures the struggle of Bertha and Jane's identity. Wide Sargasso Sea's relationship to Jane Eyre as a re-vision/rewriting is a third space that allows, I argue, for the enunciation of the other. While a postcolonial/racial foundation prompts the rewriting of Jane Eyre, the gender of both women relates to their status as subaltern. Rhys' re-vision is a complicated act of subaltern agency, in which the author locates a third space of ambivalence to reiterate the feminist struggle of Jane Eyre as well as revoke and then reinscribe critically the racial and feminist struggle of Bertha Rochester."--Abstract from author supplied metadata."In Wide Sargasso Sea, Rhys gives voice to the creole woman and provides a space for the other's enunciation by "creolizing" Jane Eyre. Rhys creates a place that is at once both Jane Eyre and not Jane Eyre, an ambivalence that captures the struggle of Bertha and Jane's identity. Wide Sargasso Sea's relationship to Jane Eyre as a re-vision/rewriting is a third space that allows, I argue, for the enunciation of the other. While a postcolonial/racial foundation prompts the rewriting of Jane Eyre, the gender of both women relates to their status as subaltern. Rhys' re-vision is a complicated act of subaltern agency, in which the author locates a third space of ambivalence to reiterate the feminist struggle of Jane Eyre as well as revoke and then reinscribe critically the racial and feminist struggle of Bertha Rochester."--Abstract from author supplied metadata.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2005
Keywords
Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys, creole, women, Jane Eyre, status, subaltern, feminist struggle
Subjects
Women and literature