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Comparing self-perception of attractiveness and overall life satisfaction : the differences between men and women

WCU Author/Contributor (non-WCU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Traci L Talbot (Creator)
Institution
Western Carolina University (WCU )
Web Site: http://www.wcu.edu/404.asp
Advisor
Candace Boan-Lenzo

Abstract: This study examined differences in self-perceived attractiveness and life satisfaction. The participants included 190 college students (108 females and 62 males). It was hypothesized that a positive correlation between perceived attractiveness and life satisfaction would exist; sex differences on attractiveness would exist with men rating themselves as more attractive than women rating themselves; attractiveness is a better predictor of life satisfaction for females than for males; and sex differences on partners’ level of attractiveness will exist, with men rating their partners as more attractive than women rating their partners. Participants completed the Estimating Physical Attractiveness Scale, the Satisfaction With Scale, and a demographics form. A positive correlation between self-perceived attractiveness and life satisfaction was found for both males and females. However, this correlation was weak. In addition, self-perceived attractiveness was not found to be a better predictor of life satisfaction for women than for men. Men and women’s ratings of self-perception of attractiveness did not significantly differ. In addition, both men and women rated their partner as more attractive then themselves, but men rated their partners as more physically attractive than women rated their partners. Exploratory analyses revealed that high levels of partner perceived attractiveness were found to be related to high levels of self-perceived attractiveness and low levels of partner perceived attractiveness were related to low levels of self-perceived attractiveness. These analyses also revealed that males and females did not significantly differ in their self-perception of attractiveness on the following domains: overall physical attractiveness, overall facial attractiveness, overall body weight or size, overall body shape or figure, and overall height. Males and females did not significantly differ in their perception of their partner’s attractiveness on the following domains: overall physical attractiveness, overall facial attractiveness, overall body weight or size, overall body shape or figure, and overall height.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2012
Keywords
Attractiveness, Life satisfaction
Subjects
Beauty, Personal -- Psychological aspects
Body image
Sex differences (Psychology)
Self-perception
Self-esteem
Satisfaction