Browse All

Theses & Dissertations

Submissions

  • Submissions (Articles, Chapters, and other finished products)

The Effects of Impervious Surfaces and Forests on Water Quality in a Southern Appalachian Headwater Catchment: A Geospatial Modeling Approach

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Christopher Lee Coffey (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Jeffrey Colby

Abstract: The water quality of streams is impacted by the land cover types that occur within their watersheds and stream corridors. Research has indicated that impervious surfaces (roads, roofs, and parking lots) exert significant stress on stream system health by increasing storm runoff and transporting pollutants into streams. Forests, on the other hand, serve to protect water quality by slowing runoff, which allows rainfall to percolate into the ground, and absorbing pollutants. This thesis research examined the effects of impervious surfaces and forests on water quality in the headwaters of the New River in Watauga County. Results demonstrated that these effects are clearly identifiable and statistically significant. Limiting the amount of impervious surfaces that occur within 100 meters of streams and establishing 50 meter forested stream buffer zones could improve water quality and help preserve stream system health.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Coffey, C.L. (2011). The Effects of Impervious Surfaces and Forests on Water Quality in a Southern Appalachian Headwater Catchment: A Geospatial Modeling Approach. Unpublished master's thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, N.C.
Language: English
Date: 2011
Keywords
Water Resources, Modeling, GIS, Land Cover Extraction, Hydrology and Hydrography