Gender Differences in Fat Talk Among American Adults: Results from the Psychology of Size Survey

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Doris Bazzini Ph.D., Professor, General Experimental Program Director (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: Vignettes were used to assess gender differences in likelihood of hearing others engage in and perceived pressure to join in positive, negative (fat talk), and self-accepting body talk. An age-representative sample of 4,014 adult women and men voluntarily responded to an emailed “Health and Wellness” survey from an internet polling company with whom they had pre-registered. Women reported more likelihood of hearing fat-talk scenarios and greater pressure to participate in them compared to men. Only a subset of participants reported frequent exposure to and pressure to join in fat talk. Demographic predictors of pressure to engage in fat talk were also examined. This was the first survey to examine body talk among older adults.

Additional Information

Publication
Martz, D. M., Petroff, A. B., Curtin, L.A., Bazzini, D. G. (2009). Gender Differences in Fat Talk Among American Adults: Results from the Psychology of Size Survey. Sex Roles :A Journal of Research, 61(1-2): 34-41. (Jan 2009) Published by Springer Verlag (ISSN: 1573-2762). DOI: 10.1007/s11199-009-9587-7 The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com.
Language: English
Date: 2009