Diversity patterns of 16S rDNA of bacteria and amoA of Archaea and bacteria from eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) rhizosphere soil

WCU Author/Contributor (non-WCU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Carter Thomas Dillow (Creator)
Institution
Western Carolina University (WCU )
Web Site: http://www.wcu.edu/404.asp
Advisor
Seán O’Connell

Abstract: Traditionally microbial communities were assessed through culturing, which limits the populations detected. Molecular techniques are becoming more popular when assessing microbial communities. To illustrate gene variability between sites terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used in this study. Bacterial 16S rDNA and archaeal and bacterial amoA diversity was examined from Albright Grove, Cataloochee, and Purchase Knob in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) using T-RFLP. Bacterial 16S rDNA T-RFLP electoferrogram peak data revealed that Cataloochee and Purchase Knob had a greater diversity compared to Albright Grove, with 60 different peaks and 17 unique peaks at each site, and 60 different peaks and 18 unique peaks, respectively, while Albright Grove had a total of 45 different peaks and 9 unique peaks. A comparison showed 28.6% of major peaks were shared between all three. Archaeal amoA T-RFLP electoferrogram peak data revealed that Cataloochee and Purchase Knob had a greater diversity compared to Albright Grove, with 105 different peaks and 30 unique peaks, and 103 different peaks and 22 unique peaks at each site, respectively, while Albright Grove had a total of 82 different peaks and 13 unique peaks at the site. No major peaks were shared between all three sites. PCR products for bacterial amoA were only produced from Purchase Knob and generated a total of 10 peaks. Overall diversity appeared to be higher in the disturbed sites of Cataloochee and Purchase Knob compared to the undisturbed site of Albright Grove. Since, the rhizosphere is a complex system a number of other variables could impact the structure of the microbial community, and must be taken into consideration when examining diversity. This study has provided insight into the spatial variability of the microbial community in the Eastern Hemlock rhizosphere, and further examination may help mediate the devastating loss of the hemlock due to an exotic adelgid species.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2009
Keywords
16S rDNA, Ammonia Oxidation, amoA, Archaea, Bacteria
Subjects
Soil microbial ecology -- Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.)
Eastern hemlock -- Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.)
Eastern hemlock -- Soils -- Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.)ark (N.C. and Tenn.)
Eastern hemlock -- Microbiology -- Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.)