Justice as Freedom, Fairness, Compassion, and Utilitarianism: How My Life Experiences Shaped My Views of Justice

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Matthew B. Robinson Ph.D., Professor (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: This essay lays out my definition of justice and traces the origins of its conception. I identify and discuss very specific life experiences and how they have affected my understanding of justice. Specific incidents include early childhood experiences, key events in adolescence, and the most important episodes from early adulthood. I examine my own family conditions and early relationships and consider the influences of certain television shows and music in childhood and adolescence. I also discuss the effects of various educational experiences. The culmination of these life experiences was the emergence of a very strong sense of justice, reciprocity, and compassion for others, particularly for the least powerful and most vulnerable in our midst. These experiences in essence pushed me into the field of criminal justice and into the worlds of academia and social justice activism. They also allowed me finally to see my mission in life and to understand how all my life experiences have shaped my sense of justice.

Additional Information

Publication
Robinson, Matthew B. (2003). Justice as Freedom, Fairness, Compassion, and Utilitarianism: How My Life Experiences Shaped My Views of Justice. Contemporary Justice Review (Dec 2003) 6(4): 329-340. Original version available from Taylor & Francis. (ISSN: 1477-2248) DOI: 0.1080/1028258032000144776
Language: English
Date: 2003