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Exercise effects on physical activity level, self-perceptions, and quality of life of sedentary children, the interaction of BMI, and the association between moderate to vigorous physical activity and psychological variables

ECU Author/Contributor (non-ECU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Kathryn Wilson (Creator)
Institution
East Carolina University (ECU )
Web Site: http://www.ecu.edu/lib/

Abstract: The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the relationship of physical activity with global self-esteem (GSE), physical self-worth (PSW), physical self-perceptions, and health related quality of life (HRQOL), and to (b) evaluate the effects of a 16 week exercise intervention on self-perception and quality of life related outcomes in sedentary youth. A sample, N = 40, of sedentary children 8-11 (M = 9.55) years of age, including 22 males and 18 females, 23 obese and 17 healthy weight participants, were assessed using the Children and Youth Physical Self-Perception Profile (CY-PSPP), Children's Attraction to Physical Activity scale and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL 4.0), pre- and post test. Accelerometers measured PA level pre- and post-test as well. Participants were randomly assigned to an exercise intervention (n = 26) and control (n = 14) condition. Exercise participants were required to exercise for one hour, supervised, at least 3 days/week over a 16-week period. Children exercised one-on-one or in small groups. Participants were required to average > 140 bpm per activity bout as measured by heart rate monitors. Activity options were limited to equipment and space available. The control group consisted of a no treatment condition. Pearson's Correlation demonstrated no significant association between physical activity and any of the psychological variables. Independent samples T-tests demonstrated similarity between the groups for most variables at baseline, and for all variables at follow-up; obese children were found to have impaired perceived body attractiveness and HRQOL physical functioning when compared to healthy weight participants. 2 x 2 Repeated Measures ANOVAs demonstrated no effect of the exercise intervention on any of the outcome variables for healthy weight or obese participants. Overall, the current investigation implies that moderate to vigorous physical activity level may lack association with global self-esteem, physical self-worth, physical self-perceptions and HRQOL among inactive 8-11 year olds. Additionally, basic exercise interventions may be insufficient to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity level, and improve global self-esteem, physical self-worth, physical self-perceptions, and HRQOL among inactive healthy weight or obese children.  

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Date: 2010
Keywords
Kinesiology

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TitleLocation & LinkType of Relationship
Exercise effects on physical activity level, self-perceptions, and quality of life of sedentary children, the interaction of BMI, and the association between moderate to vigorous physical activity and psychological variableshttp://thescholarship.ecu.edu/bitstream/handle/10342/2942/Wilson_ecu_0600M_10216.pdfThe described resource references, cites, or otherwise points to the related resource.