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Assessing the Risk of IADL Tasks from the Perspective of Medically-at-risk Older Adults and their Caregivers

ECU Author/Contributor (non-ECU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Jennifer Gaudy (Creator)
Institution
East Carolina University (ECU )
Web Site: http://www.ecu.edu/lib/

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to was to understand the impact of chronic disease on the functional ability of older adults by determining which instrumental activities of dialing living (IADL) are most meaningful and may pose a safety hazard for the medically-at-risk older adult who plans to live independently. Data was collected through individual interviews with twelve older adults and their caregivers. The participants had to be recently discharged from a hospital due to their chronic disease that include heart disease, stroke, COPD, dementia, or diabetes. Data analysis indicates that the most important IADLs were driving, managing medication, cooking, and phone use. Participants reported all IADL tasks affected by chronic disease except managing finances and phone use. Qualitative results revealed discrepancy between the caregiver's and participant's perception of driving ability which leads to concerns for safety. It is also suggested there may be safety concerns with medication management. Further examination and research should compare older adults' perception of functional performance and actual performance of IADL tasks.  

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2009
Keywords
Gerontology, Older Adults, meaningfulness, Managing medication, IADL, Driving, Occupational Health and Safety, Occupational Therapy

This item references:

TitleLocation & LinkType of Relationship
Assessing the Risk of IADL Tasks from the Perspective of Medically-at-risk Older Adults and their Caregivershttp://thescholarship.ecu.edu/bitstream/handle/10342/2231/Gaudy_ecu_0600M_10051.pdfThe described resource references, cites, or otherwise points to the related resource.