Behavioral Impact of a Corporate Driving Policy: Undesirable Side-Effects Reflect Countercontrol

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Timothy D. Ludwig Ph.D., Professor (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: Pizza deliverers at two stores received turn-signal policy statements with two paychecks in an AB1B2 multiple baseline design. At Store A turn-signal use rose from a baseline mean of 70% to 78% after the first policy statement and to 84% after the second policy statement. At Store B turn-signal use rose from a baseline mean of 46% to 51% after the first policy statement and to 59% after the second policy statement. Concurrent observations of safety-belt use showed decreases from 78% to 65% at Store A and 74% to 59% at Store B after the first policy statement.

Additional Information

Publication
Ludwig, T.D., & Geller, E.S. (1999). Behavioral impact of a corporate driving policy: Undesirable side-effects reflect countercontrol. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 19 (2), 25-34. Version of record published by Taylor & Francis and is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/ (ISSN: 0160-8061) DOI: 10.1300/J075v19n02_03
Language: English
Date: 1999
Keywords
corporate policy, countercontrol, safety belt, turn signal