Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the SF-36 in older adults with diabetes in Beijing, China

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Kenneth Gruber, Evaluation Section Chair (Creator)
Jie Hu, Associate Professor (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: Objective This study investigated the psychometric properties of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) (China version) in older Chinese with diabetes living in Beijing, China. Methods The SF-36 was administered to community-based sample of 182 older adults with diabetes living in Beijing. Data collection was conducted in face-to-face interviews. Reliability and validity were assessed using internal consistency, convergent and discriminant analyses. Exploratory principal components analyses (PCA) were conducted to compare the sample's response patterns with the hypothesized scale constructs. Results Item level validation of the scale supported the assumptions of the hypothesized structure. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha >.70) of the subscales were acceptable except for the General Health subscale (.67). PCA confirmed general support of the two hypothesized dimensional factors and eight concepts (factors). The physical component summary (PCS) and the mental component summary (MCS) explained 62.26% of the variance and the eight factors components explained 67.39% of the variance. Known-group comparisons of scale scores indicated significantly higher levels of functionality for respondents with no blood pressure, heart, or depressive symptomatology problems. Conclusions The Chinese version of the SF-36 showed good reliability and validity and was culturally equivalent. The scale is appropriate for use with older Chinese adults with diabetes.

Additional Information

Publication
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 88 (3), 273-281.
Language: English
Date: 2010
Keywords
Psychometrics, SF-36, Health-related quality of life, Older Chinese adults, Diabetes