Perceptions Of Self-Determination In Music Therapy For Individuals Diagnosed With Intellectual Disabilities: A Survey Of Music Therapists

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Katelyn Beebe (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: https://library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Cathy McKinney

Abstract: Individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) experience positive outcomes and desire to participate in decision making but are often less likely to access this right than their peers without a diagnosis. These individuals may be able to increase their proficiency in self-determination through practice but it is unclear the extent to which they may be involved in healthcare related decisions, specifically while participating in music therapy. Through a survey of board-certified music therapists, the purpose of this study was to identify aspects of self-determination being incorporated into music therapy treatment with individuals diagnosed with I/DD and to determine the extent to which self-determination is emphasized. A total of 327 participants indicated working with individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities and were included in the results of this study. Results of this study indicated elements perceived by music therapists to be essential to self-determination, benefits associated with access to self-determination, methods of incorporating self-determination into music therapy sessions, and relationships between work experience, attitudes about self-determination, and the frequency of self-determination being incorporated into sessions.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Beebe, K. (2020). Perceptions Of Self-Determination In Music Therapy For Individuals Diagnosed With Intellectual Disabilities: A Survey Of Music Therapists. Unpublished Master’s Thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2020
Keywords
self-determination, music therapy, survey, intellectual disabilities

Email this document to