Memory, awareness, and automaticity : cognitive patterns of sexually aggressive and sexually nonaggressive men

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Karen Marie Yescavage (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Jacquelyn Whtie

Abstract: The purpose of the current study was to compare cognitive processing styles of sexually aggressive (SA) and sexually nonaggressive (NSA) men. Of particular interest was the way in which these two groups of men processed sexual, aggressive, and sexually coercive information. Additionally, the current study assessed to what degree consciousness or lack of consciousness influenced memory performance of such information. Based upon the presumption that SA men chronically perceive their world in more sexual and aggressive terms, it was predicted that they, as compared to NSA men, would frequently cognitively process such types of information automatically, i.e., with little effort, control, and awareness. Thus, it was hypothesized that SA men, as opposed to NSA men, would take longer to complete a task in which they were asked to avoid processing such information. A predicted consequence of this hypothesized way of processing was poor memory. Therefore, a second hypothesis tested was SA men, as compared to NSA men, would demonstrate poorer memory performance on a recognition test of sexual, aggressive, and sexually coercive information.

Additional Information

Publication
Dissertation
Language: English
Date: 1992
Subjects
Rape $x Psychological aspects
Men $x Attitudes
Aggressiveness
Sex (Psychology)
Cognitive styles

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