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Beating the odds: weather effects on a short season population of mice.

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Matina C. Kalcounis-Rüppell, Associate Professor (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: We examined 11 years of data on reproductive success, survival, and population dynamics of two popula-tions (Fortress and Grizzly) of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in the Kananaskis Valley, Alberta, to investigate the extent to which the dynamics of these populations is dictated by weather conditions. Summer population growth was not related to the population growth in the winter preceding the breeding season or to spring population density. Over the summer on the Fortress grid, population growth was positively related to adult survival, whereas on the Grizzly grid, population growth was positively related to nestling survival. Neither summer population growth nor demographic correlates of summer population growth was consistently related to weather patterns. On Fortress, adult survival during the breeding season was negatively correlated with precipitation. On Grizzly, nestling survival during the breeding season was negatively correlated with precipitation. Winter population growth was inversely proportional to the fall population density prior to the winter but neither was related to weather conditions. Climate limits seasonal breeding in these populations, but compensatory responses appear sufficient to accommodate extreme weather conditions during both the breeding and nonbreeding seasons.

Additional Information

Publication
Canadian Journal of Zoology 80: 1594-1601
Language: English
Date: 2002
Keywords
Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), Kananaskis Valley, Alberta, Weather conditions