Understanding How Western-Trained Music Therapists Incorporate Chinese Culture In Their Practice In China: An Ethnographic Study

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Jessica Marie Donley (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: https://library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Melody Schwantes Reid

Abstract: Although music therapists work with Chinese people in the United States, Canada, Australia, and China, little is known about how these music therapists incorporate Chinese culture in their practice in order to provide culturally-responsive music therapy. This ethnographic research study aimed to understand how Western-trained music therapists incorporated Chinese culture in their practice in China. The researcher observed music therapy sessions of two Western-trained music therapists in a neurologic rehabilitation and mental rehabilitation department in a hospital in China. The two music therapists, two of their clients, and two facility professionals were interviewed. Six categories were identified in the analysis. The findings indicated that Western-trained music therapists incorporated Chinese culture in their session by: using “mixture” music, developing and maintaining guanxi with various individuals, using multiple models of music therapy, using a variety of active and receptive experiences, using the Chinese Mandarin language, and acknowledging that music therapy is a natural therapy. Overall, themes of mixture were in several of the categories suggesting that music therapy with Chinese people is a “mixture” music therapy. Future research by Chinese music therapists is needed to understand varying perspectives of culturally-responsive music therapy for Chinese people.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Donley, J. (2017). Understanding How Western-Trained Music Therapists Incorporate Chinese Culture In Their Practice In China: An Ethnographic Study. Unpublished Master’s Thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2017
Keywords
Culturally-responsive music therapy, music therapy, culture, Chinese culture, ethnography

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