THE MODERATING EFFECT OF COPING STYLE AND SELF-ESTEEM ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIT WORRY AND RELATED OUTCOMES

WCU Author/Contributor (non-WCU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Jonathan Rupert Fink (Creator)
Institution
Western Carolina University (WCU )
Web Site: http://library.wcu.edu/

Abstract: This study aimed to examine the moderating effects of coping-style and self esteem on the relationship between trait worry and positive and negative related outcomes, which consisted of catastrophizing (i.e., blowing life events out of proportion),self-efficacy (i .e. , the belief that upcoming life events can be overcome masterfully), and social anxiety.The participants of the present study consisted of 120 (60 males and 60 females)undergraduate students. The arithmetic mean age for the participating undergraduates was (M = 18.99, SD = 1.39). The majority of participants were first year students(65.8%). Each participant completed a demographic form and six questionnaires designed to measure trait worry, coping style, self-esteem, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and social anxiety.Moderated Multiple Regression (MMR) aimed to explore the relationship between trait-worry, coping style, self-esteem, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and social anxiety.Six hypotheses were generated to determine if problem-focused coping and/or self-esteem influenced the relationship between trait worry and catastrophizing, self efficacy,and social anxiety. Overall, no support was found to support any of the 6 hypotheses generated; however, a number of positive, inverse, and negative bivariate correlational relationships were found .The results indicated that trait worry was significantly related to catastrophizing,but problem-focused coping was not significantly related to catastrophizing. Second,problem-focused coping was significantly related to self-efficacy, but trait worry was not significantly related to self-efficacy. Third, worry was significantly related to social anxiety, as well as problem-focused coping. Fourth, self-esteem was not significantly related to catastrophizing. Fifth, self-esteem was significantly related to self-efficacy, but trait worry was not significantly related to self-efficacy. Finally, trait worry was significantly related to social anxiety, but self-esteem was not significantly related to social anxiety. These findings, undoubtedly, parallel a number of other research findings within the domain of trait worry.

Additional Information

Publication
Dissertation
Language: English
Date: 2006

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