Dietary adherence among older community living adults in central North Carolina to specific dietary recommendations of the 2005 dietary guidelines for Americans

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Melissa Soban (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Martha Taylor

Abstract: "The Dietary Guidelines for Americans identify dietary recommendations designed to prevent and/or manage chronic disease among all persons two years of age and older. This study sought to determine dietary adherence among a convenience sample of community living older adults in central North Carolina to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Selected variables of the Assessment of Dietary Intake, Health Status, and Biomarkers of Nutritional Status of Older Adults study (n = 101), a study that assessed nutritional status among older community living adults in central North Carolina, were evaluated. Eighty-eight participants met the study inclusion criteria (mean age 73.6+6.3 years). A food frequency questionnaire assessed dietary intake. Specific nutrient and dietary component recommendations outlined in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were compared with calculated dietary intake data to determine percent of sample adherences to and percent of recommended intakes consumed by this sample. The majority of the sample was female (84%) and Caucasian (74%), obtained a high school education or its equivalent (GED) (78%), reported a monthly income that was above the poverty threshold (78%), was overweight/obese (70%), reported being food secure (85%), and reported themselves as being more highly physically active (52%). Sixty-nine percent of this sample reported at least one nutrition-related chronic condition and 42% at least two. Total sample percent of sample adherences to daily dietary recommendations of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were lowest for whole grain (6%) and potassium (6%) recommendations, and highest for fat-related recommendations [total fat (58%), saturated fat (58%), and cholesterol (94%)]. Weekly vegetable subgroup percent of sample adherences were lowest for legumes (1%), orange (17%), and dark green (24%) vegetables, and highest for starchy (43%) and "other" vegetables (63%). This research indicates nutrition education efforts should target the need for community living older adults in central North Carolina to increase whole grain intake, improve vegetable variety, and decrease sodium intake to improve dietary adherence to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Other messages are needed to emphasize the need for older adults in central North Carolina to further decrease their total fat and saturated fat intakes."--Abstract from author supplied metadata.

Additional Information

Publication
Dissertation
Language: English
Date: 2007
Keywords
Dietary Guidelines, Americans, recommendations, prevent, manage, disease
Subjects
Older people--Nutrition--North Carolina
Older people--Nutrition--Evaluation
Diet--Standards--United States.