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Through their eyes : a look at achievement and success of selected African American male students

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Tracy L. Holder (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Ulrich Reitzug

Abstract: "The presence and implications of societal, institutional, and personal influences on African American male achievement in school was examined in this study. Through in-depth qualitative research strategies, the researcher sought to ascertain the perceptions of 5 African American male students, who are struggling academically and behaviorally in school, regarding the influences they believe are impacting their school experiences. The data confirmed that no single factor is solely responsible for these students' struggles in school. However, there are factors stemming from the societal, institutional, and personal influences that collectively impact their school success. At the institutional and personal levels of influence, factors consist of the lack of engaging instruction, the absence of significant connections to school adults, a limited role of parental support with education, and the negative influence of peers to misbehave in school. Although only one student acknowledges the influence of societal factors related to his surroundings and the cost of success for African American students as a contributor to his lack of success in school, the societal influence lurked beneath the surface of all of the participants' experiences and beliefs."--Abstract from author supplied metadata.

Additional Information

Publication
Dissertation
Language: English
Date: 2006
Keywords
implications, societal, institutional, personal, influences, African American, male, achievement, school
Subjects
African American students--Social conditions
African American youth--Education
Academic achievement--United States
Children with social disabilities--Education