Dana Dunn

  • Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor
  • Office of the Provost, UNCG
  • 201 Mossman Building
  • Greensboro NC 27402-6170

Dr. Dana Dunn came to UNCG in August of 2014 to serve as Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. She assumed the role of Acting Chancellor in March of 2015, until the arrival of Chancellor Gilliam in September 2015. In her role as Provost, she is responsible for oversight of the Academic Affairs Division, Research and Economic Development, and Student Affairs. Shortly after her arrival, Dr. Dunn launched the university's strategic planning process, which will culminate in a new plan to guide UNCG forward to the year 2025. Prior to her arrival at UNCG, Dr. Dunn held a series of leadership roles at the University of Texas at Arlington, including Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Special Advisor to the President, Senior Vice Provost, and Associate Dean. Provost Dunn is also a Professor of Sociology. Her past teaching and research focused on gender and the workplace. She is author of several textbooks and many articles and book chapters on these topics. Dr. Dunn was recognized for her leadership in higher education with a number of awards including Distinguished Sociology Alumnus at the University of North Texas, The YWCA Women in Business Award, The Arlington Women’s Shelter Legacy of Women in Education Award, and The Arlington branch of the American Association of University Women Woman of the Year award. Dr. Dunn is a native Texan and a first generation college graduate. She earned her undergraduate and Master’s degrees in Sociology and Political Economy from the University of Texas at Dallas, and her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of North Texas.

There are 6 included publications by Dana Dunn :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Gender inequality in education and employment in the scheduled castes and tribes of India 1993 2459 The complex stratification systems in India give rise to a multiplicity of social categories which often obscure the relative status of women and men within the more disadvantaged segments of the population. The focus of this study is on the situatio...
The Incorporation of Gender Scholarship into Sociology 1998 584 The prospects of an intellectual revolution in sociology informed in part by a feminist perspective loomed large in the early 1970s. Following Ward and Grant's (1985) empirical examination of gender and feminist scholarship in sociology journals betw...
Learning by doing: group projects in research methods classes 1996 1087 In this paper we describe an approach to teaching research methods that involves student group projects.1 Many authors acknowledge the merits of group or collaborative learning at the college level (Bouton and Garth 1983; Bruffee 1984; Helmericks 199...
The methodological inclinations of gender scholarship in mainstream sociology journals 2000 560 This article examines the types of research methods sociologists studying women and gender use in articles published in mainstream journals. The research is based on an analysis of 1,826 gender-content articles published between 1984 and 1993 in 15 m...
Psychic Powers, Astrology & Creationism in the Classroom? Evidence of Pseudoscientific Beliefs Among High School Biology & Life Science Teachers 1990 1723 Many authors and researchers have noted the popularity of pseudoscientific beliefs in the United States.1,2 Although pseudoscience is not a new phenomenon (it has been around at least as long as science itself [Trefil 1978]), some suggest that pseudo...
A View from the Top: Gender Differences in Legislative Priorities Among State Legislative Leaders 2008 870 Women are no longer token participants in the governing process in U.S. state legislatures. Rather, they comprise more than one fifth of the state legislative membership and have become a visible force in leadership, holding about fifteen percent of ...