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Loren L. Schweninger

Education: Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1972; M.A., University of Colorado, 1966; B.A., University of Colorado, 1962. My research interests include: Race and Slavery in the United States, African American History, the Nineteeth Century South, and Documentary History. For the Race and Slavery Petitions Project, launched in 1991, see http://library.uncg.edu/slavery_petitions. Retired from UNCG in July of 2012.

There are 22 included publications by Loren L. Schweninger :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Alabama Blacks and the Congressional Reconstruction Acts of 1867 1978 622 Freedmen|Alabama Reconstruction|
The American Missionary Association and Northern Philanthropy in Reconstruction Alabama 1970 889 "The results of attempts by . . . the missionary societies to educate the negro in Alabama," wrote Walter Lynwood Fleming at the turn of the century, "were almost wholly bad . . . ."1 "Northern missionaries were religious fanatics,"2 he continued, "w...
Antebellum Free Persons of Color in Postbellum Louisiana 1989 5824 During the first fifteen years after the Civil War the landholdings of former free persons of color in Louisiana virtually disappeared. While historians have long shown an interest in the economic activities of Louisiana's free people of color during...
Black Citizenship and the Republican Party in Reconstruction Alabama 1976 657 PERHAPS NO ASPECT OF ALABAMA HISTORY HAS RECEIVED more scholarly attention in the past decade than the period of Reconstruction. Studies by Sarah van Woolfolk Wiggins,1 William Cash,2 and Robert Gilmour,3 have examined the po-litical, social, and ec...
Black Owned Businesses in the South, 1790-1880 1989 5059 This essay analyzes the changing configuration of black-owned businesses in the South over nearly a century. It divides region into two sections-the Lower South and the Upper South-and examines changes that occurred prior to 1840, during the late ant...
Counting the Costs: Southern Planters and the Problem of Runaway Slaves, 1790-1860 1999 938 In our recent book Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation, John Hope Franklin and I seek to answer a number of questions about runaways: how, when, and why they ran away, where they went, how successful they were in remaining at large. We also exam...
Delving into the Past: County Court Records and the Pursuit of History. 1998 361 In his famous autobiography, historian and scholar Henry Adams recounted his teaching experiences at Harvard University during the 1870s. Dissatisfied with the lecture method, Adams experimented with different ways to teach. One technique that he ado...
James Rapier and the Negro Labor Movement 1975 728 BORN OF FREE BLACK PARENTS IN FLORENCE, ALABAMA, a quarter century before the Civil War (1837) , James Thomas Rapier emerged during Reconstruction as one of the South,s outstanding political leaders. At the Tennessee Negro suffrage convention (only s...
John Carruthers Stanly and the Anomaly of Black Slaveholding 1990 2890 For many years after his death in the mid-1840s, residents of Craven County, North Carolina, recalled the remarkable career of slave-born John Carruthers Stanly, who had risen from bondage to become one of the most prosperous planters in the area. St...
A Negro Sojourner in Antebellum New Orleans 1979 715 Many blacks, slave and free, considered the slave trading capital of the South in quite a different light—as a place of enjoyment, excitement, and delectation, even, ironically, as a refuge from the brutalities of the South's "peculiar institution." ...
Property Owning Free African American Women in the South, 1800- 1870 1990 3679 Until recently, historians have paid little attention to the subject of property ownership among African-American women (or any women for that matter) during the nineteenth century. Early studies of slavery concentrated primarily on their role as "ma...
Prosperous Blacks in the South, 1790-1880 1990 4240 For many years, historians paid only slight attention to blacks who reached the upper economic levels in the nineteenth-century South. In 1905, amateur historian Calvin Dill Wilson wrote a ten-page essay in the North American Review called "Black Mas...
The Roots of Enterprise: Black Owned Businesses in Virginia, 1830-1880 1992 2575 In the three decades before the Civil War, even the most resourceful free blacks confronted formidable obstacles in seeking to establish a business. Often illiterate, lacking skills, and mired in poverty, they struggled merely to survive. Some had sp...
A Slave Family in the Ante-Bellum South 1975 1992 Twentieth century scholars of Afro-American history have offered two basically different interpretations concerning the effect of slavery on the black family. In his famous 1932 study The Negro Family in the United States, Negro sociologist E. Frankl...
Slave Independence and Enterprise in South Carolina 1992 1334 "EVERY MEASURE THAT MAY LESSON THE DEPENDENCE OF A Slave on his master ought to be opposed, as tending to dangerous consequences," a group of slaveholders in Orangeburg District, South Carolina, declared in a petition to the state legislature in 1816...
Slave women, county courts and the law in the United States South: a comparative perspective 2009 629 This article provides an analysis of how slave women, during the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War, filed civil suits for their freedom in the county courts. The cases occurred primarily in the Upper South. It is argued in this art...
Slavery and Southern Violence: County Court Petitions and the South’s Peculiar Institution 2000 411 In subsequent years, and after using From Slavery to Freedom in my African American history classes, I came to appreciate how important it was to understand the place of violence in Southern history. Of course, a number of scholars have focused on th...
Thriving Within the Lowest Caste: The Financial Activities of James P. Thomas in the Nineteenth-Century South 1978 599 Yet, even in slavery James Thomas had laid the foundation for his later financial success, learning the values of frugality, hard work, and business enterprise. At the age of fourteen, in Nashville, Tennessee, he was hired out as an apprentice barber...
"To the Honorable": Divorce, Alimony, Slavery, and the Law in Antebellum North Carolina 2009 1742 In both style and substance, the petition of Harriet Laspeyre was similar to many other memorials presented to the North Carolina General Assembly and, in subsequent years, to the superior courts of the state concerning divorce, alimony, and slavery ...
The Underside of Slavery: The Internal Economy, Self-Hire, and Quasi- Freedom in Virginia, 1780-1865 1991 1669 From the beginning of the twentieth century, scholars have shown an keen interest in various aspects of black life in Virginia. In 1902, J. C. Ballagh published A History of Slavery in Virginia in. Johns Hopkins Press series on race and slavery; and ...
A Vanishing Breed: Black Farm Owners in the South,1651-1982 1989 2166 "I'm getting too old to battle it," sixty-nine-year old farmer Matthew Grant lamented in an 1987 interview. He had purchased his first sixty acres in 1947 for $3500 and eventually expanded his holdings to 190 acres, but increasing costs, low returns,...
The Vass Slaves: County Courts, State Laws, and Slavery in Virginia, 1831-1861 2006 982 In the name of God Amen, Philip E. Vass of Halifax County, Virginia, wrote on 8 August 1831, being of sound mind and disposing Memory, Calling to reflection the Mortality of my body & being desirous to dispose of My Earthly possessions; do ordain thi...