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Charles P. Egeland

**Research Interests: Paleoanthropology; Paleolithic Archaeology; Diet and Subsistence; Zooarchaeology; Vertebrate Taphonomy; Paleoenvironmental Studies **My research revolves around reconstructions of human-environment interactions in the past. I focus primarily on the analysis of animal bones from archaeological sites in order to understand diet and subsistence and to reconstruct past environments. I have conducted fieldwork in the American West and Midwest in addition to Germany, Tanzania, Kenya, South Africa and, most recently, the Republic of Armenia. My current interests involve the dispersals of Homo erectus from Africa around 2 million years ago and understanding Neandertal adaptations in the Caucasus. Since 2009 I have co-directed (with my colleague Boris Gasparian) the Lori Depression Paleoanthropological Project, which is a joint venture between the Department of Anthropology at UNCG and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography at the National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia. The purpose of this project is to document the Paleolithic settlement of northeastern Armenia and to understand the adaptations of Paleolithic peoples in the region. I am also involved (with my colleague Ryan Byerly) in a reanalysis of the bison archaeofauna from the well-known Paleoindian site of Olsen-Chubbuck in Colorado.

There are 9 included publications by Charles P. Egeland :

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Beyond leopards: tooth marks and the contribution of multiple carnivore taxa to the accumulation of the Swartkrans Member 3 fossil assemblage 2004 785 The ca. 1.0 myr old fauna from Swartkrans Member 3 (South Africa) preserves abundant indication of carnivore activity in the form of tooth marks (including pits) on many bone surfaces. This direct paleontological evidence is used to test a recent sug...
Carcass processing intensity and cutmark creation: An experimental approach 2003 545 Cutmarks observed in archaeofaunal assemblages are an important source of evidence in the reconstruction of prehistoric butchery strategies. Inherent in these reconstructions is the assumed covariance of the intensity of butchery activities and the r...
Disentangling Early Stone Age palimpsests: determining the functional independence of hominid- and carnivore-derived portions of archaeofaunas 2004 430 Determining the extent to which hominid- and carnivore-derived components of fossil bone palimpsests formed independently of each other can provide valuable information to paleoanthropologists interested in reconstructing the foraging adaptations of ...
Experimental patterns of hammerstone percussion damage on bones: implications for inferences of carcass processing by humans 2006 786 The common occurrence of hammerstone percussion damage (pits, striae, notches and impact flakes) on the fossil limb bones of ungulates indicates that marrow extraction has been an important component of hominid butchery for over two million years. Be...
An inter-site comparison of enamel hypoplasia in bison: implications for paleoecology and modeling Late Plains Archaic subsistence 2004 300 Bison bison mandibular molars from the Late Plains Archaic kill/butchery sites of Buffalo Creek (Wyoming) and Kaplan-Hoover (Colorado) exhibit significant frequencies of dental enamel hypoplasia (DEH), a defect believed to reflect information about p...
New data and ideas on the foraging behaviour of Early Stone Age hominids at Swartkrans Cave, South Africa 2004 203 New data and Interpretations presented in this paper update and augment the previous state of knowledge of early hominid subsistence behaviour at Swartkrans Cave during the formation of the Member 3 depositional unit (c. 1.0 million years 8g0). Un...
Taphonomic perspectives on hominid site use and foraging strategies during Bed II times at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania 2008 534 The faunal assemblages excavated by Mary Leakey in Bed II of Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, have, like the more well-known Bed I assemblages, traditionally been interpreted as the result of hominid butchering activities in the lake margin and riverine sett...
Testing the “shift in the balance of power” hypothesis at Swartkrans, South Africa: Hominid cave use and subsistence behavior in the Early Pleistocene 2008 891 C.K. Brain documented two interesting patterns in the Pleistocene faunas of Swartkrans Cave, South Africa: (1) The earliest depositional units, Members 1 and 2, preserve high numbers of hominid fossils, while the numbers drop sharply in the more rece...
Unraveling hominid behavior at another anthropogenic site from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania): new archaeological, taphonomic and technological research at BK, Bed II 2009 682 New archaeological excavations and research at BK, Upper Bed II (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania) have yielded a rich and unbiased collection of fossil bones. These new excavations show that BK is a stratified deposit formed in a riverine setting close to an...