Browse All

Theses & Dissertations

Submissions

  • Submissions (Articles, Chapters, and other finished products)

Phylogeography and Mating System of Spiraea Virginiana Britton: A Multi-Scale Exploration of the Biology of a Threatened Species

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Sarah Jo Pate (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Zack Murrell

Abstract: This thesis explores the genetic structure and reproductive biology of Spiraea virginiana, a threatened shrub endemic to 2nd and 3rd order drainages in the southern Appalachians and Cumberland Plateau. I analyzed a dataset created with eight Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs), and conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on maximum parsimony. To assess maternal relationships within the species, I sequenced three regions of non-coding chloroplast DNA, and conducted a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. In addition, I constructed and mapped a haplotype network and major clades identified in the Bayesian analysis. Both analyses showed little structure within drainages and potential relatedness across elevational gradients, although drainages were not sampled heavily. I conducted pollination treatments in a common garden setting and in three wild populations along the New River in Ashe County, NC. Results from these treatments tentatively suggest the species has a mixed mating system, and can reproduce sexually, contrary to prior observations. However, seed size, seed weight, and fruit set were variable among populations. With the knowledge provided by both studies, I conclude that sexual reproduction in the species may be more common than previously thought, and that, based on the patterns revealed by the phylogeography, seed may be wind-dispersed.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Pate, S.J. (2010). Phylogeography and Mating System of Spiraea Virginiana Britton: A Multi-Scale Exploration of the Biology of a Threatened Species. Unpublished master's thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2010
Keywords
genetics, plant mating system, conservation, self-incompatibility, Rosaceae