The reliability of children's self-reported internalizing symptoms over brief- to medium- length time intervals

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Kurt D. Michael Ph.D., Professor of Psychology & Dir. of Clin. Serv. (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: Objective: To determine whether children between the ages of 8 and 12 years are able to reliably report internalizing symptoms over short to medium-length time intervals as measured by an objective self-report instrument of internalizing symptoms. Method: The Internalizing Symptoms Scale for Children (ISSC) was group-administered initially to 131 children and at subsequent intervals of 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. Results: Pearson product-moment correlations for the ISSC total scores of the participants were computed across the various retest intervals. At 2 weeks, the correlation was .84. At 4 weeks, the correlation was .76. After 12 weeks, the correlation was .74. Conclusions: These data indicate that children between 8 and 12 years old can reliably report their experience over short to medium-length intervals. These findings provide strong support for the ISSC as a research and clinical instrument for the assessment of internalizing symptoms in children between 8 and 12 years of age, which may ultimately prove beneficial in the identification and treatment of childhood internalizing disorders. Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Additional Information

Publication
Michael, K. D., & Merrell, K. W. (1998). The reliability of children's self-reported internalizing symptoms over brief- to medium- length time intervals. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 37:2, pp.194-201. Feb. 1998. (ISSN: 0890-8567) Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Language: English
Date: 1998
Keywords
reliability, internalizing symptoms, self-report, children