Level of Attainment and Retention of Knowledge about Elderly Depression and Suicide Held by Direct Care Staff at Long-Term Care Facilities

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
John William LoCurto (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Edwin Rosenberg

Abstract: Depression and suicidal ideation are pervasive among elderly residents and patients in long-term care (LTC) facilities, but they are frequently unrecognized and undertreated. Research suggests adequately treating depression can decrease health-care costs for seniors. The purpose of this study was to assess the base knowledge and rate of learning and retention among direct care and other LTC staff. A study utilizing a nonprobability sampling of 86 available subjects was conducted using a demographic questionnaire and a test regarding knowledge of elderly depression and suicide. It was a repeated measures design that assessed caregiver knowledge prior to a training intervention, immediately following the intervention and again one month later. The data were analyzed using a paired-samples t-test of difference in means. Positive correlations were found between knowledge and education and experience, with more educated and experienced staff having greater ability to retain new knowledge. The results of this study support the use of ongoing LTC staff trainings.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
LoCurto, J.W. (2011). Level of Attainment and Retention of Knowledge about Elderly Depression and Suicide Held by Direct Care Staff at Long-Term Care Facilities. Unpublished master's thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2011
Keywords
Elderly Depression Elderly Suicide Caregiver Training Long-term Care Training Retention