Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and its effect on the fluid dynamic and epithelia of the cervix

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Scott Brady Rhyne (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Nathan Mowa

Abstract: Cervical remodeling (CR) is a complex process, among other things, associated with collagen dissociation, increase in edema and tissue mass, and is loosely categorized in four overlapping, but uniquely regulated stages. Our knowledge on the role of the microvasculature and the underlying mechanisms in this process (CR) is incomplete. VEGF, a potent vascular permeability factor, mitogen and key angiogenic architect, has been shown to mediate edema and cellular proliferation in several tissue types. Our lab has previously characterized expression of VEGF and its receptors in the cervix, and identified VEGF-regulated genes during CR using DNA microarray. Here, we use various techniques, serum protein tracking dye (Evans Blue), VEGF agents and rodents and show that VEGF likely plays a role in CR, in part, by inducing expression of tight junction genes, vascular permeability, serum protein tissue infiltration, edema and epithelial cell growth.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Rhyne, S.B. (2010). Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and its effect on the fluid dynamic and epithelia of the cervix. Unpublished master's thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2010
Keywords
Cervical remodeling, Edema, Tight junctions, Epithelia, VEGF