Trends in mid-latitude cyclone frequency and occurrence during fire season in the Northern Rockies: 1900-2004.

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Peter T. Soule' Ph.D., Professor (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: We examined changes in the timing and frequency of major midlatitude cyclones (MLCs) during August through October for eight climate stations in the Northern Rockies from 1900-2004. As MLCs can effectively diminish fire activity through both cooler temperatures and higher humidity/precipitation, we also determined if area burned by wildfires from 1940-2004 was correlated with the timing and frequency of these events. Our results indicate that: (1) significant long-term trends in MLCs exist, as the timing of the first MLC has occurred later in the year during the past century, with a marked upward shift post-mid-1980s; (2) MLC frequency has significantly declined since 1900, with a pronounced decrease also beginning in the mid-1980s; (3) the relationships between the timing of the first MLC and frequency of MLCs with forest area burned are significant; and (4) mid-tropospheric ridging upstream from the Northern Rockies that blocks MLCs has become more pronounced. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

Additional Information

Publication
P. A. Knapp and P. T. Soulé. (2007) “Trends in midlatitude cyclone frequency and occurrence during fire season in the Northern Rockies: 1900-2004.” Geophysical Research Letters. 34(20) L20707 [Oct 25, 2007] doi:10.1029/2007GL031216. Published by American Geophysical Union.
Language: English
Date: 2007