Alice Wright Ph.D

Dr. Wright is an anthropological archaeologist broadly interested in the dynamics of cross cultural encounters and the ways in which far-reaching interaction networks shape and are shaped by local social, political, economic, and ideological institutions. She currently studies pre-Columbian interactions in the Eastern United States – specifically, the Middle Woodland Hopewell phenomenon and its expression in the American Southeast. Recently, she focused on the Garden Creek site in western North Carolina, where she explored the relationships between community aggregation, monumentality, and craft production and exchange. Her ongoing and future research projects include: (1) geochemical and technological stylistic analyses of Blue Ridge mica artifacts; (2) investigation of Middle Woodland settlement patterns in the Appalachian Summit; (3) collaborative fieldwork at the Middle Woodland Pinson Mounds site in west Tennessee. These and other projects engage diverse field and lab methods, including near-surface geophysical prospection and GIS-based analyses, and will involve collaborations with the public and other stakeholders in archaeological research.

There are 9 included publications by Alice Wright Ph.D:

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Book Review - Center Places And Cherokee Towns: Archaeological Perspectives On Native American Architecture And Landscape In The Southern Appalachians, by Christopher B. Rodning 2016 8 Book Review of Center Places and Cherokee Towns: Archaeological Perspectives on Native American Architecture and Landscape in the Southern Appalachians, by Christopher B. Rodning. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2015. 280 pp.
Book Review - Hopewell Ceremonial Landscapes Of Ohio: More Than Mounds And Geometric Earthworks, by Mark J. Lynott 2017 32 Book review of Hopewell Ceremonial Landscapes of Ohio: More than Mounds and Geometric Earthworks. By: MARK J. LYNOTT. 2015. Oxbow Books, Oxford, United Kingdom. 288 pp.$34.00 (paper), ISBN 978-1782977544.
The Context And Consequences Of Sexual Harassment In Southeastern Archaeology 2018 38 In 2014, the Southeastern Archaeological Conference (SEAC) conducted a sexual harassment survey of its membership. The survey's goal was to investigate whether sexual harassment had occurred among its members, and if so, to document the rate and demo...
The Future Of American Archaeology: Engage The Voting Public Or Kiss Your Research Goodbye! 2018 20 Over the past several years, we have seen many attacks on publicly funded and mandated archaeology in the United States. These attacks occur at the state level, where governors and state legislatures try to defund or outright eliminate state archaeol...
History, Monumentality, And Interaction In The Appalachian Summit Middle Woodland 2014 40 The Middle Woodland period in eastern North America witnessed a florescence of monumental architecture and material exchange linked to widespread networks of ritual interaction. Although these networks encompassed large geographic areas and persisted...
Local And ‘‘Global’’ Perspectives On The Middle Woodland Southeast 2017 1306 During the Middle Woodland period, from 200 BC to AD 600, south-eastern societies erected monuments, interacted widely, and produced some of the most striking material culture of the pre-Columbian era, but these developments are often overshadowed by...
Private Property, Public Archaeology: Resident Communities As Stakeholders In American Archaeology 2015 1218 In the United States, archaeological sites on private lands have few legal protections, and are thus at risk of damage or destruction. To alleviate these risks, archaeologists must engage thoughtfully with private property owners and develop strategi...
Prospecting For New Questions: Integrating Geophysics To Define Anthropological Research Objectives And Inform Excavation Strategies At Monumental Sites 2014 22 Geophysical data have the potential to significantly contribute to archaeological research projects when effectively integrated with more traditional methods. Although pre-existing archaeological questions about a site may be answered using geophysic...
Ritualised Craft Production At The Hopewell Periphery: New Evidence From The Appalachian Summit 2015 1136 Ritual items made of thin mica sheet are among the most spectacular of the special objects from the Hopewell sites of the Ohio Valley. Hitherto it has generally been believed that the mica was imported in raw material form from sources in the Appalac...