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Theses & Dissertations

Submissions

Sahakyan, Lili

UNCG

There are 6 item/s.

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Can you Forget what you Believe? Directed Forgetting of Attitude Information 2007 630 Research shows that people can intentionally forget previously learned information when instructed to do so - known as the directed forgetting effect (for a review, see MacLeod 1998). The current experiments investigated intentional forgetting of sel...
Individual differences in forgetting strategies 2008 531 Two experiments employed a combination of item method and list method directed forgetting methodologies (Bjork, LaBerge, & Legrand, 1968). Participants studied two lists of items, half of which were subsequently cued to-be-forgotten (TBF) or to-be-re...
Investing the "time" in time-based prospective memory 2011 604 Time-based (TB) prospective memory tasks require the estimation of time in passing - known as prospective timing. Prospective timing is said to depend on an attentionally-driven internal clock mechanism, and is thought to be unaffected by memory for ...
Beliefs about item memorability affect metacognitive control in item-method directed forgetting 2012 579 Across six experiments, I examined the role of metacognitive control in item-method directed forgetting. In Experiment 1, participants studied loud and quiet items, which were subsequently cued as to-be-remembered (TBR) or to-be-forgotten (TBF). Typi...
The effect of list two length on context information in list-method directed forgetting 2012 180 The current study investigated the claim that in list-method directed forgetting, List 2 must be as long as List 1 in order to obtain directed forgetting (Pastötter & Bäuml, 2010). Participants studied two lists of words for a later memory test, and ...
The effect of context-change on retrospective time estimates 2014 52 Research using the list before last paradigm demonstrates that retrieval of a previously learned list (L0) between encoding of two other lists (L1 and L2) leads to forgetting of L1 -- an effect attributed to internal context-change (e.g., Jang & Hube...