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Theses & Dissertations

Submissions

Gibson, Mary Ellis

uncg

There are 6 item/s.

TitleDateViewsBrief Description
Ponder and believe: interpretive experiments in Victorian literary fantasies 2009 1513 This dissertation examines experimental Victorian fantasy novels in order to provide an alternate history for the Victorian era, one traditionally associated with the realist novel. Texts are discussed using fantasy theory, reader-response criticism,...
The impulse to tell and to know: the rhetoric and ethics of sympathy in the Nineteenth-century British novel. 2010 1238 My dissertation examines how some nineteenth-century British novels offer a critique of the dominant narrative of sympathy by suggesting that the most ethical encounter will preserve distance between self and other while retaining the ability to exch...
Euphemism's usefulness: elusive eros in the novels of Charlotte Brontë 2011 2136 In this project, I examine the uses of euphemistic language and concealed erotic content in Charlotte Brontë's novels Villette and Jane Eyre with additional support from Shirley. Based on historicize...
Fashioning femininities: sartorial literacy in english domestic fiction, 1740-1853 2011 1835 In this dissertation I argue that by using, adhering to, or subverting cultural conventions and tacit sumptuary laws, heroines of English domestic novels take advantage of society's scopic nature, exploiting the gaze in order to control and author th...
The Rhetoric of Prostitution in Victorian England 2011 1727 This dissertation interrogates the network of social ideas and agents that rhetorically constructed the female prostitute through configurations of space and identity while participating in rhetorics of professionalization. While considering genre as...
Oceans apart: women readers in the Nineteenth-century British and American novel 2011 1005 This dissertation provides a transatlantic, historical approach to women's reading, analyzing within that context representations of fictional women readers, bearing in mind the cultural anxiety surrounding "the reading habit." These fictional reader...