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Universally composable zero-knowledge protocol using trusted platform modules

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Vivek Reddy Sama (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/
Advisor
Stephen Tate

Abstract: Cryptographic protocols that are established as secure in the Universally Composable (UC) model of security provide strong security assurances even when run in complex environments. Unfortunately, in order to achieve such strong security properties, UC protocols are often impractical, and most non-trivial two-party protocols cannot be secure in the UC model without some sort of external capability (or "setup assumption") being introduced. Recent work by Hofheinz et al provided an important breakthrough in designing realistic universally composable two party protocols, in which they use trusted, tamper proof hardware as a special type of helping functionality which they call a catalyst. Hofheinz et al. use government issued signature cards as a catalyst to design universally composable protocols for zero-knowledge proofs and commitments, but did not give a complete security proof for either protocol. In this thesis, we consider another form of security hardware, Trusted Platform Modules (TPMs), which are more widespread than signature cards and are currently shipped as a part of almost every business laptop or desktop. Trusted Module Platforms are tamper evident devices which support cryptographic functionalities including digital signatures, but have a different key management model from signature cards. In this thesis we consider TPMs as catalysts and describe a universally composable zero knowledge protocol using Trusted Platform Modules. We also present a complete security proof for both the Hofheinz's universally composable zero knowledge protocol from signature cards and our universally composable zero knowledge protocol using TPMs as a catalyst.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Language: English
Date: 2011
Keywords
Universally Composable, Security, Trusted Platform Modules
Subjects
Computer security
Computer crimes $x Prevention