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Tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology across the Triassic- Jurassic boundary in northeastern Arizona

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Andrew B. Heckert Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: Nonmarine fluvial, eolian and lacustrine strata of the Chinle and Glen Canyon groups in northeastern Arizona and adjacent areas preserve tetrapod body fossils and footprints that are one of the world’s most extensive tetrapod fossil records across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We organize these tetrapod fossils into five, time-successive biostratigraphic assemblages (in ascending order, Owl Rock, Rock Point, Dinosaur Canyon, Whitmore Point and Kayenta) that we assign to the (ascending order) Revueltian, Apachean, Wassonian and Dawan land-vertebrate faunachrons (LVF). In doing so, we redefine the Wassonian and the Dawan LVFs. The Apachean-Wassonian boundary approximates the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. This tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Triassic-Jurassic transition on the southern Colorado Plateau confirms that non-crocodilian crurotarsan extinction closely corresponds to the end of the Triassic, and that a dramatic increase in dinosaur diversity, abundance and body size preceded the end of the Triassic.

Additional Information

Publication
Tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology across the Triassic- Jurassic boundary in northeastern Arizona: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 29, p. 84-94. (ISSN 1524-4156) Archived in NC DOCKS with permission of the editor. The version of record is available at: http://econtent.unm.edu/
Language: English
Date: 2005