Primary care providers need a variety of nutrition and wellness patient education materials

UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
H. William Gruchow, Professor (Creator)
Martha L. Taylor, Associate Professor and Director of the Dietetic I (Creator)
Institution
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG )
Web Site: http://library.uncg.edu/

Abstract: Objective: To assess and document the need for nutrition and wellness patient education materials. Design The results of open-ended interviews and focus groups were used to develop a mail-type survey. The 46-item survey addressed barriers to using nutrition and wellness education materials as well as format, education/reading level, foreign languages, and topics needed. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service (NCCES) family and consumer education agents distributed surveys to family and general practices throughout North Carolina. Subjects: Of the 721 primary care providers surveyed, 303 (42%) returned usable surveys. Respondents practiced in 89 of the 100 counties of the state served by NCCES family and consumer education agents. Statistical analysis performed: Descriptive statistics and independent sample t tests were used to analyze survey results. Results: Limited time with patients and inability to obtain materials because of cost or being unsure of sources were most often identified as barriers to using nutrition and wellness materials. Of the 26 topics surveyed, 6 had mean levels of need greater than or equal to high need (mean score [greater than or equal to] 4): weight control for adults, smoking cessation, changing dietary fat intake, exercise guidelines for healthy adults, general stress management guidelines, and healthful eating for older adults. Twenty-four of the 26 topics had mean levels of need greater than or equal to moderate need (mean score [greater than or equal to] 3). Topics with moderate need included guidelines for overweight children and adolescents, nutrition for chronic disease prevention, and healthful eating for various stages of the life cycle. The combined mean score for topics dealing with weight control and exercise for adults, adolescents, and children was greater than the score for high need (mean score [greater than] 4). Eighty-three percent of respondents preferred 1-page, printed handouts. Forty-five percent requested materials in Spanish. Applications: Dietitians who work in a variety of settings can use techniques similar to those described here to determine the patient education materials practitioners need for the populations they serve. The information obtained from this study will be used to develop 1-page, printed handouts. A registered dietitian and a food and nutrition specialist with NCCES will develop and pilot-test the handouts. These materials will be made available to primary care providers in North Carolina via local NCCES family and consumer education agents, many of whom are registered dietitians.

Additional Information

Publication
Kenner MM, Taylor ML, Dunn PC, Gruchow HW, Kolasa K. Primary care providers need a variety of nutrition and wellness patient education materials. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 99:462-466 (1999).
Language: English
Date: 1999
Keywords
Nutrition, Wellness, Patient education, Primary care, Handouts