Economic Analysis of Automotive-Derived Engine-Generator Sets as Energy Conversion Systems at Small Landfills

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Miriam Nabil Makhyoun (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/
Advisor
Joseph Cazier

Abstract: This study is an economic analysis of the cost and longevity of modified automotive engine-generator sets as an economical method for small landfills to produce electricity. Internal combustion engines are common in landfill gas to electricity projects, but automotive engines have not been carefully studied yet represent a less expensive alternative to industrial internal combustion engines. The energy conversion system at the Watauga County Landfill in Boone, North Carolina, is composed of two 93 kW KSD Enterprises-General Motors Vortec (8.1 liters) engines attached to a Taylor Power Systems generator. Interviews with the managers of landfill projects using automotive-derived engine generator sets were conducted by phone and via email. The questions included the landfills’ cost of energy conversion systems, revenue, payback period, funding sources, operations, and engine oil and landfill gas testing methods. The findings indicate that small landfills benefit from the economics of this appropriate technology.

Additional Information

Publication
Thesis
Makhyoun, M.N. (2011). Economic Analysis of Automotive-Derived Engine-Generator Sets as Energy Conversion Systems at Small Landfills. Unpublished master's thesis. Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.
Language: English
Date: 2011
Keywords
Methane, engines, landfill gas, energy, industrial applications for electricity production