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Relationships Among Subjective and Objective Measures of Tongue Strength and Oral Phase Swallowing Impairments

ASU Author/Contributor (non-ASU co-authors, if there are any, appear on document)
Heather Clark Ph.D., Associate Professor (Creator)
Institution
Appalachian State University (ASU )
Web Site: http://www.library.appstate.edu/

Abstract: A growing literature documents the relationship between tongue strength and oral phase swallowing function. Objective measures of strength have been recommended as more valid and reliable than subjective measures for the assessment of tongue function, yet subjective measures remain the more commonly used clinical method for assessing tongue strength. This study assessed the relationships among subjective and objective measures of tongue strength and oral phase swallowing impairments. Both subjective and objective measures of tongue strength were observed to be good predictors of the presence of oral phase swallowing impairments. The specific oral phase swallowing functions of bolus manipulation, mastication, and clearance were moderately correlated with subjective ratings of tongue strength. Experienced and inexperienced raters appeared to judge tongue strength differently, with the ratings of experienced raters being more predictive of swallowing function.

Additional Information

Publication
Clark, H. M., Henson, P.A., Barber, W. D., Stierwalt, J. A. S. & Sherrill, M. (2003). Relationships among subjective and objective measures of tongue strength and oral phase swallowing impairments, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, (Feb 2003) 12(1), 40 - 50. Published by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ISSN: 1058-0360).
Language: English
Date: 2003